Fashiondairy: Tree Hugger

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Hello hello!

Before you ask, I should let you know that this project has nothing to do with trees. But since you’re here, why don’t you spend a few minutes talking with me? Recently I’ve been having trouble keeping my accessories organized and my chains untangled. Yes, it’s a problem plenty of us face—the jewelry problem—too many necklaces to handle, too little space to carry them all.

So here are some snapshots of what I did to solve this problem. My attempt to make a tree-inspired jewelry stand was definitely an interesting experience, but now I have a stronger idea of the do’s and don’t’s of working with wire.

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I whipped out my trusty Fiskars scissors and jewelry pliers, both of which I purchased this past summer. They’ve been such a huge help for the times I needed to do things quickly and efficiently. If you plan to craft frequently, I suggest you seek out some solid tools to use for your projects!

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The trickiest part of preparing for this project was purchasing the right wire. I’ve worked with both copper and steel wire for art assignments and jewelry explorations, but copper is a hands-down favorite for me. I ran to my local hardware store to pick up some copper wire, but a glimpse of green caught my eye. Even better, this plastic-coated steel wire cost half as copper (usually around eight or nine dollars a reel), and was calling my name.

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To start, I measured an even amount of wire pieces similar in size, around the length from my palm to my elbow. Along the way, I found it was best to straighten out the wire pieces from their comfortable coiled forms.

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Lining the pieces up on one end primed the wire for the twisting involved for the next step.

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Gradually and consistently twisting the wire formed a thicker trunk for the stand. There were two sides of strays on either side of the trunk. One group was longer than the other.

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I took the shorter clump of stray ends and fanned them out at an angle from the trunk to create the base. This step is where my jewelry pliers finally made their appearance!

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Next, I curled the ends and flattened them with my pliers.

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Then, I twisted the longer wire group into branches. I combined two wire pieces for each branch, which added to the tree visually as well as structurally. I also tucked in the ends as I did with the bottom part of the jewelry holder.

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If you decide to try this out, you’ll be ready to show off your latest jewelry pieces—all for less than five dollars! If you do, let me know how it goes and send me a picture if you can at fashiondairyjasmine@gmail.com!

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Well, WIRE you still here? Go out and enjoy your day! Have an amazing one, you deserve it!

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Words and images by Jasmine Toy

8 thoughts on “Fashiondairy: Tree Hugger

    1. Hi Lauren!!

      Thanks so much for reading my post!!! It means so much to me. If I had to do it over, I’d probably add more branches/wire to the piece for a more stable foundation.

      Feel free to ask me questions or send me a photo if you decide to give it go!! Awesome New Year’s resolutions post, by the way.

      xxJasmine

  1. This is a neat rendition! When I was in elementary school I remember being amazed when I saw one of these out in a bead shop off of Market. (I went home to remake it, but with my own twist. Let’s just say my parents never let me touch the soldering iron again without supervision.) Anyway, I was wondering what the gauge is of the wire you used?

    1. Hahah thanks! I think I saw someone on Market selling one of these, too! It was a lot more elaborate and far too beautiful to be a jewelry holder, though.

      I’m pretty sure I used 18-gauge, plastic-coated steel wire! It was difficult to bend even with pliers, probably because of the thick plastic that kept flaking off as I worked.

      Thanks for checking out the post! Send me a pic of what you make and maybe I’ll be able to create a post featuring everyone’s work!

      xxJasmine

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